Tuesday, 12 May 2009

QR codes - Coca-Cola Japan launch mobile initiative to promote new tea drinks

Coca-Cola have launched a QR code campaign in Japan to promote two new Coca-Cola tea drinks. Ads show a QR code and if this is photographed with a mobile phone, the photo can then be shown to a vending machine that will distribute a free tea.

Vending machines are everywhere on the streets of Japan and a large number have mobile payment mechanisms. The following photo from Hirosan shows how Japanese vending machines are set up for mobile scanning and mobile payment:

Free Coke!, originally uploaded by hirosan

Coca-Cola News Japan has more details of the promotion and shows both the new tea products and instructions on how to redeem the free drinks from vending machines:

Coca-Cola Japanese QR codes
Coca-Cola News illustrating the new QR code promotion

This is not the first time that Coca-Cola have used QR codes in Japan (they were part of the Sokenbichia re-launch last year), however the new Coca-Cola campaign is another great example of how versatile QR codes can be - offering more than just a link to a mobile site. This is also a good illustration of how mobile, micro-payments can operate and it will be interesting to see what happens as this gains traction in the UK.

Hat tip (the font of all QR code knowledge!) Roger at 2D code

Related posts
QR codes hitting the mainstream - Pepsi, CSI:NY, fashion etc
QR code short story competition
Insqribe offer QR code social network functionality
QR codes - big in Japan and the Sun is now bringing them to the UK

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1 comment:

Stewart McKie said...

Nick - Great to see someone else evangelizing mobile tagging. We're focused on tag management, that is linking tags to useful information and content, and we offer individuals the ability to create up to six different types of 'Vizitag' for free at our site Vizitag.com - please check it out. We are using Microsoft tags rather than QR codes but the principles are the same.